Actors Workshop Boston

10, Oct 2022
Nichum Aveilim – Defined  

The question of whether or not one can fulfill the mitzvah of nichum aveilim after shiva has been a subject of debate among halachic decisors for centuries. The Shulchan Aruch (YD 340:1) rules that one may not do so, as the mitzvah applies only during the initial seven-day period of mourning. However, many more recent authorities have taken a lenient stance on the matter, ruling that one may indeed fulfill the mitzvah after shiva. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at the different arguments on both sides of the issue and try to arrive at a conclusion. this content

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 340:1) rules that one may not do nichum aveilim after shiva. The logic behind this ruling is that the mitzvah applies only during the initial seven-day period of mourning; once shiva is over, the mourner is no longer considered to be in a state of grief and is therefore exempt from the mitzvah. This opinion is based on a passage in Masekhet Semachot (7a), which states that “the mitzvah of comforting mourners applies only for seven days.”

However, many more recent authorities have taken a lenient stance on the matter, ruling that one may indeed fulfill the mitzvah after shiva. The primary justification for this leniency is the passage in Masekhet Moed Katan (27b), which states that “even after shiva has ended, one continues to feel grief.” Therefore, even though the initial period of mourning has come to an end, the mourner is still considered to be grieving and thus subject to the mitzvah of nichum aveilim.

The halakhic authorities are divided on this issue, with some rulings prohibiting fulfilling nichum aveilim after shiva and others permitting it. In our opinion, the lenient opinion should be followed in cases where there is potential for doubt, as it is always better to err on the side of performing a mitzvah than neglecting it. However, in cases where it is clear that the mourner has moved on from his or her grief and is no longer grieving, it would presumably be inappropriate to perform nichum aveilim. Ultimately, each individual must consult with his or her own rabbi or posek to determine whathalakhically permissible in their specific case.